On 15th October 2014 Transport Minister, Keith Brown, announced that the procurement process to build and design two new ferries for use on the Clyde and Hebrides Ferry Services network had been launched. The ferries are being designed to provide a fully flexible year-round service for Arran and the Uig Triangle, subject to final review by CalMac Ferries Ltd, CMAL and Transport Scotland.  The vessels they replace will be cascaded throughout the network.

In October 2015, following a rigorous procurement process, we were delighted to announce that Ferguson Marine Engineering Ltd (FMEL) in Port Glasgow had been awarded the contract worth £97 million to build the two 102 metre ‘dual-fuel’ ferries. FMEL will undertake the detailed design and construction work of the new vessels in Scotland, as well as their testing, equipping, launching and delivery. The first ferry is expected to enter service in early 2018, with the second vessel following a few months later.

The ferries will be ‘dual-fuel’ vessels so they can operate on liquefied natural gas (LNG) and marine diesel. LNG is significantly cleaner and has been adopted by ferry operators in Northern Europe in response to tighter emissions regulations.

The ships are designed to carry 127 cars or 16 HGVs or a combination of both and up to 1,000 passengers. The ships will be capable of operating across a range of drafts and speeds to meet the requirements of the current operator, CalMac Ferries Ltd, to service a wide range of ports and routes.

The contract will provide a boost for commercial shipbuilding on the Clyde and follows the shipyard’s delivery of the first two hybrid ferries for the CMAL fleet, with the third due to launch in December this year.

FERGUSONS STURGEON 3

Setting sail for a greener future – July 2016

Richard Hadfield of Transport Scotland’s Ferries Unit visits Ferguson Marine Engineering in Port Glasgow and witnesses work on the two state-of-the-art vessels.

Steel Cutting –  February 2016

Steel was cut on 17th February 2016 for our two new ferries being built by Ferguson Marine Engineering Ltd (FMEL), marking the start of construction on the £97 million vessels.

Dual Fuel

The steel cutting ceremony took place at FMEL’€™s shipyard in Port Glasgow, Scotland, where the ships are being built. Derek Mackay, the Scottish Government’s Minister for Transport and Islands, joined Tom Docherty, former CEO and Liam Campbell from FMEL, to push the button to start the steel cutting machine.

The new 102m, roll on roll off vehicle passenger ferries are designed to carry 127 cars or 16 HGVs or a combination of both and up to 1,000 passengers.  The ships will be capable of operating across a range of drafts and speeds to meet the requirements of the operator to service a wide range of ports and routes.

The ferries will be dual-fuel vessels so they can operate on liquefied natural gas (LNG) and marine gas oil. LNG is significantly cleaner and has been adopted by ferry operators in Northern Europe in response to tighter emissions regulations. FMEL will undertake the detailed design and construction work of the new vessels in Scotland, as well as their testing, equipping, launching and delivery. The designs and drawings will be shared on our website when they are finalised in the coming months.

Erik Østergaard commented on the day:

œThe new ferries will provide a lifeline ferry service for the communities they will serve and are currently earmarked for the crossing between Ardrossan and Brodick and on the Uig Triangle route, although the final decision on vessel deployment rests with the ferry operator. We look forward to taking delivery of the ferries in 2018.€

We anticipate the first ferry launching late in 2017 and entering service in 2018, with the second vessel following a few months later. The vessels are currently known as hulls 801 and 802 and we will run a competition later in the year to name the new ferries.

We met with Community Councillors in North Uist to deliver a presentation on the new ferries.  A copy of the PowerPoint presentation, which includes early designs, a comparison with the existing ferry service and information on the LNG fuel is available here.

Fabrication is now underway and the images below show progress to date.

Images of steel cutting ceremony are copyright of Mark Gibson at the Evening Times

Dual Ferrier Updatea

Project update – March 2017

The construction of two dual fuel ferries is approaching a new project milestone as the first vessel, currently known as Hull 801, nears the 75 per cent steelwork fabrication stage, Caledonian Maritime Assets Limited (CMAL) has announced.

The second vessel, Hull 802 is following closely behind, currently at 60 per cent steelwork fabrication.

Two hulls side by side at shipyard

 

The 102 metre vessels will be capable of operating on liquefied natural gas (LNG) and marine gas oil (MGO), reducing emissions to help meet Scottish Government reduction targets across transport.  They are being designed to provide a fully flexible, year-round service for Arran and the Skye Triangle routes.

Last month, the dual fuel engines that will power the vessels were delivered to Ferguson Marine Engineering Limited’s shipyard in Port Glasgow, where the ships are being built.  The 147m3 LNG tanks supplied by Wartsila – a stand out feature of the new vessels, measuring 20.4 metres in length and 4 metres in diameter – are nearing completion and are expected to be delivered to the shipyard in June 2017.  Work is also underway on the aluminium superstructure that will form the accommodation block of the ships.

Dual fuel engines are delivered

The new ships will be highly manoeuvrable, with Twist Flow Costa Bulb Flap Rudders, three 620 kW bow thrusters and a 480 kW stern thruster.  An innovative stern ramp will slide transversely, allowing the ships to operate on several routes across the service network.

LNG Fuel tank

CMAL, which owns ferries, ports and harbours across the west coast of Scotland, has published a series of project photos of the hulls, engines and fuel tanks, as well as artist impressions to visualise what the ships will look like when complete.

The new vessels are earmarked for the Arran and Skye Triangle routes, although the final decision on routes is subject to review by CalMac Ferries Ltd, CMAL and Transport Scotland.  The first ferry is expected to enter service in the second half of 2018, with the second vessel following a few months later.

Artist impression